Camila Bruder

Main research areas

  • Aesthetic preferences 

  • Music cognition/perception

  • Singing performance

Vita

Education

2014 – 2018Master of Arts in Systematic Musicology at Universität Hamburg
2009 – 2013Bachelor’s degree in Music - Singing at the State University of Sao Paulo (UNESP, Brazil)
2005 – 2007Master of Sciences - Human Physiology at the University of Sao Paulo (USP, Brazil)
2000 – 2004Bachelor’s degree in Biology at the University of Sao Paulo (USP, Brazil)

Career

Since 2018Ph.D student, Department of Neuroscience, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics
2009 – 2016freelance singer and voice teacher
2002 – 2003Laboratory technician and research assistant in Cellular Biology laboratory. Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Parasitology - Sao Paulo School of Medicine, Federal University of Sao Paulo (UNIFESP, Brazil)
  

Publications

Publications

Bruder, C. & Wöllner, C. (2018, September). Subvocalization in singers: a study using EMG, laryngoscopy and expert ratings. Poster session presented in: 34. Jahrestagung der Deutschen Gesellschaft für Musikpsychologie, Gießen, Germany. 

Bruder, C. & Ribeiro-do-Valle, L. E. (2009). Influence of separate and mixed experimental designs on reaction times to two simple visual stimuli. Psychology & Neuroscience, 2(1), 3-9. 

 

 

Awards & Grants

Awards & Grants

2017/ 2018Degree completion grant from Universität Hamburg
2018Forumpreis für hervorragende Hausarbeit, awarded by the Forum Musikwissenschaft an der Universität Hamburg, for the essay “Subvokalisation: eine laryngoskopische und elektromyographische Pilotstudie“
2013Music Department’s Award of Excellence for the Bachelor Thesis in Music: “Analysis and performance of the Lied ‘Der Hirt auf dem Felsen’, by Franz Schubert”
2006-2007Research scholarship, Coordination for Improvement of Higher Level Personnel (CAPES, Brazil)

Projects

  • Singing Voice Preferences

    As suggested by the many singing contests and music programs in the media, the singing voice attracts ample attention. Recent studies showed that lay and expert listeners share similar definitions of what is “correct” when listening to untrained ...