Dr. Johanna Rimmele

Main research areas

  • Auditory perception/cognition
  • Temporal processing
  • Neural basis of speech perception
  • Content specific representations
  • Neuroplasticity

 

 

 

Vita

Academic Education

2008-2012PhD in Psychology, Research training group “Function of Attention in Cognition” at the Cognitive and Biological Psychology group, University of Leipzig
2006-2011Visiting Researcher, Albert Einstein College of Medicine Dominick P. Purpura Department of Neuroscience, New York
2002-2008Diploma in Psychology (minor Philosophy), University of Leipzig
2007-2012Training and volunteer work, Crisis Intervention, Leipzig

Career

Since 2015Post-Doctoral Fellow, Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics
2012-2015Post-Doctoral Fellow, Department of Neuro- and Pathophysiology, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
2011-2012Post-Doctoral Fellow, New York University, Department of Psychology

Publications

Journals

Rimmele, J. M., Morillon, B., Poeppel, D., & Arnal, L. H. (2018). Proactive sensing of periodic and aperiodic auditory patterns. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, in press.

Gudi-Mindermann, H., Rimmele, J.M., Nolte, G., Bruns, P., Engel, A.K., Röder, B. (2018). Working memory training in congenitally blind individuals results in an integration of occipital cortex in functional networks. Behavioural Brain Research, in press

Rimmele, J. M., Gross, J., Molholm, S., Keitel, A. (2018) Brain oscillations in human communication. Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 12, 39. doi: 10.3389/fnhum.2018.00039

Rimmele, J. M., Gudi-Mindermann, H., Nolte, G., Roeder, B., & Engel, A. K. (2017). Working Memory Training Integrates Visual Cortex into Beta-Band Networks in Congenitally Blind Individuals. bioRxiv. doi.org/10.1101/200121

Rimmele, J. M., Sussman, E., & Poeppel, D. (2015). The role of temporal structure in the investigation of sensory memory, auditory scene analysis, and speech perception: a healthy-aging perspective. International Journal of Psychophysiology, 95(2), 175–183. doi.org/10.1016/j.ijpsycho.2014.06.010

Rimmele, J. M., Zion Golumbic, E., Schröger, E., & Poeppel, D. (2015). The effects of selective attention and speech acoustics on neural speech-tracking in a multi-talker scene. Cortex, 68, 144–154. doi.org/10.1016/j.cortex.2014.12.014

Rimmele, J., Schröger, E., & Bendixen, A. (2012). Age-related changes in the use of regular patterns for auditory scene analysis. Hearing Research, 289(1–2), 98–107. doi.org/10.1016/j.heares.2012.04.006

Rimmele, J., Sussman, E. S., Keitel, K., Jacobsen, T., & Schröger, E. (2012). Electrophysiological Evidence for Age Effects on Sensory Memory Processing of Tonal Patterns. Psychology and Aging, 27(2), 384–398. doi.org/10.1037/a0024866

Rimmele, J., Jolsvai, H., & Sussman, E. (2011). Auditory Target Detection Is Affected by Implicit Temporal and Spatial Expectations. Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, 23(5), 1136–1147. doi.org/10.1162/jocn.2010.21437

 

Book (Dissertation) and E-books

Rimmele, J., Gross, J., Molholm, S., Keitel, A., eds. (2018). Brain Oscillations in Human Communication. Lausanne: Frontiers Media. doi: 10.3389/978-2-88945-458-7

Rimmele, J. (2013). Intact hearing, but impaired understanding – Sensory memory processing in healthy old age. (Vol. 35). Leipzig: Leipziger Universitätsverlag GmbH.

Awards & Grants

Awards & Grants

2016/2017

Sign UP! Careerbuilding for outstanding female post docs in the MPG

2013

8th dissertation competition of the German Society for Psychology, General Psychology Group

2011-2012

Stipendium, ERASMUS MUNDUS Student Exchange Network in Auditory Cognitive Neuroscience

2009-2010

 Reisestipendien der Research Academy Leipzig

2009

Mid Winter Meeting Travel Award der Association of Research in Otolaryngology

2008-2011

Doctoral scholarship der Deutschen Forschungsgemeinschaft (DFG)

2005-2007

 Stipendium der Studienstiftung des Deutschen Volkes

 

Projects

  • What in the temporal structure of speech triggers speech-specific processing

    The precise role of cortical oscillations in speech processing is under investigation. According to current research, the phase alignment of Δ/θ-band (2-8 Hz) neural oscillations in the auditory cortex is involved in the segmentation of speech. ...

  • Linguistic Decoding

    When we listen to someone speaking, we are able to quickly and effortlessly understand the content of the spoken language. This ability, however, obscures the complexity of the neural processes that underlie comprehension. One of the first steps that ...

  • Are you in sync with yourself? Coordination of speech production and perception

    In this project we test the influence of rhythmic speech production on speech perception. Auditory perception has been shown to utilize temporal predictions from the motor system to increase its performance (Arnal, & Giraud, 2012; ...

  • Speech chunking

    In a recent study, Ding et al. (2016) showed that spectral peaks of brain waves corresponded to multiple levels of linguistic structure (e.g., peaks in the delta and theta range corresponded to the phrase and syllable rate, respectively). Because ...

  • Are you speaking to me?

    Although we intuitively know if someone is speaking or singing, the neuronal mechanisms that drive this experience are not well understood. Whether we perceive auditory sequences as speech or song is associated with certain acoustic features ...